Patrick Alexander Bunyip

Amazing.

Hey dresdencodak, Cube’s comic wasn’t passive-aggressive behaviour; rather it was what we call ‘satire’, you vicious egomaniac. Please check your own aggressive-aggressive behaviour next time you feel the blood rising.

You’re in your 30s now Diaz, for goodness’ sake. You style yourself as an even-keeled Edwardian gentleman; it’s just a matter of staying in character, surely.

Funny thing is, only about a third of the responses to Cube’s comic that I saw actually mentioned you; everyone else thought it was about Joss Whedon or just general male nerdery. But you took it personally, and now everyone knows. Now everyone knows.

Also, nice try getting your own little stab in and then declaring, “THERE IS NO PLACE IN WEBCOMICS FOR THIS SORT OF PETTY NONSENSE;” like what counts as ‘drama’ or not begins and ends with you. Aaron Diaz, and people who are nice to Aaron Diaz: the only adults in webcomics.

cubewatermelon:

Sometimes I think it’s okay to just admit that you like looking at certain kinds of people naked and that’s okay.

Yesssssss.

I’M NINE HUNDRED AND FORTY-THREE!!!

captainfaraday:

THE AGE OF THE DOCTOR

This is the age of the Doctor, split up into the length of time each regeneration spent puttering around the universe. His total age is 3,325, and this is how I put it together:

The lifespan of the classic-era Doctors was really simple. Ironically, their continuity was pretty damn good compared to revived-era, and the ages discussed all add up and fit together. (Except for a few figures that are clearly complete outliers, like the Third Doctor claiming to be 1,000 one time, which I ignored).

A few things to note are that the First Doctor didn’t steal the Tardis until he was in his 230s, and that the Eighth Doctor spent 600 years trapped on the planet Orbis.

The revived series is where it starts to get tricky, though. (We’ll get to the War Doctor in a moment, pun intended.) The Seventh Doctor claimed he was “starting to lose count”, though, so I’m taking that into consideration: I’ve made judgments based on the lengths of time that we-the-audience actually see evidence of the Doctor living for, rather than simply what age he cites. (Though I accepted the latter in the absence of contradictory evidence.)

The Ninth Doctor claims to be around 900 - which already can’t be true, since the Fifth Doctor was around that age when he regenerated into the Sixth. I put solving that discrepancy on hold for a minute, and decided to first figure out the length of time the Doctor lived for between his Ninth and Eleventh incarnations - regardless of the starting age of the Ninth Doctor, the same amount of time passed between Nine and Eleven.

We know that the Eleventh Doctor spent 900 years on Trenzalore, and that just before going to Trenzalore, he was 400 years older than the War Doctor. Which means there’s a 400 year gap in which the Ninth, Tenth, and (pre-Trenzalore) Eleventh’s lives take place. But how to split that 400 years between the three of them?

The Eleventh Doctor claimed to be 907 just after regenerating and 1,200 just before Trenzalore, giving him 293 of those 400 years - consistent with other figures we see over Eleven’s adventures. That leaves 107 to divide between the Ninth and Tenth Doctors. The Tenth Doctor has lived for at least 3 years when he gives his age as 903, putting his starting age at around 900 (on the revived-series age numbers) rather than the Ninth. With that and his regeneration in mind, the Tenth Doctor lived for 7 years, leaving a square 100 for the Ninth.

…which doesn’t really add up. The Tenth Doctor travelled with three companions for around a year each, spent a year trapped by the Master, and almost 3 years searching for Martha, plus he had then “lived too long” in solitary by his own admonition - hardly the words of a man who used up an entire regeneration to stay around a bit longer, if he was only 7. Since that figure contradicts evidence we can see, I’m going to assume the Seventh Doctor was right, and that he’s lost track a bit. It’s also implied that the Ninth Doctor had just regenerated when he met Rose, and he had (from what we see) fewer solo adventures than the Tenth Doctor. So I’m going to split that remaining 100 years between the two, resulting in 50 for the Ninth and 57 for the Tenth. This is also consistent with the lifespan of the classic-era Doctors, so I argue it’s the most elegant possible decision.

So: now to settle the “900” problem. We know the War Doctor fought the Time War for 400 years, but if the Tenth was 907 when he regenerated, that would put the Eighth Doctor’s age around 400 when he regenerated. But we know he was still the First Doctor at that age! The solution is remarkably simple. The age of “900” was already suspect, so instead, I went with the evidence of what we’ve seen - which says the Eighth Doctor was 1,725 when he regenerated. So I just kept counting from there. And surprise, the numbers are now entirely consistent!

The Doctor, when he finished his first regeneration cycle, was approximately 3,425 years old. So when the Twelfth Doctor says he’s lived for over two thousand years, he really means it.

-

Sources: mostly me watching the show itself for decades, but this page gives a nice outline. I’ve also included the tenures of each actor as the current Doctor, to see how they match up to their in-universe duration.

Working out the Doctor’s personal timeline is, I think, at the more feasible and useful end of ‘ultimately hopeless nerd projects for hopeless nerds’ (the other end is where you’ll find people trying to arrange the Zelda games into a single continuity), and I think Martin’s done a good job here, and more importantly, he’s shown his working, which is always the most interesting part of this sort of thing.

I remember at the time thinking that Nine giving his age as 900 was obviously untrue (at the very least, its roundness makes it seem merely approximate) and meant to create the right impression rather than satisfy continuity. It ‘feels’ right; it tells us this person is very, very old, yet not unimaginably old; not so old that he’s totally alien and incomprehensible. Old enough that he’s not even sure how old he is and it doesn’t matter. And the blatant incorrectness of it was like a message to old, nerdy, detail-obsessed Doctor Who fans: You’re welcome here, but this is a fresh start, so don’t think too hard about it. This is the ninth doctor, so he’s 900 years old, okay? Like, whatever, you know?

And all of that — the symbolism and deliberate vagueness of the age ‘900’ — is why it rubbed me the wrong way when, in Ten’s first story, the Doctor proclaimed, “I’m nine hundred and three years old!” completely out of nowhere. It felt like listening to music and someone playing the wrong note, sharp, and two octaves high, and I hadn’t felt that before in the revival up to that point. I just didn’t see the point of the sudden, weird, restrictive specificity of it — and the writers kept doing it! “I’m nine hundred and six!” “I’m nine hundred and seven!”

I guess it wasn’t so much the specificity itself; it’s that it was specificity built on vagueness; it retroactively made ‘900’ seem like it was meant to be strictly accurate. It was disharmonious. If Nine had told Rose something like, “I’m 2,894 years old,” and they’d added numbers from there, it would have been fine. I suppose you could interpret “I’m nine hundred and three!” as the Doctor trying to rebuild his sense of self or whatever, but that sounds like feeble, post-facto bullshit to me.

So if Twelve is giving his age as “over 2000”, I’m happy about it, until the following series where they’ll have him say, “I’m over 2000 years old, plus one” I suppose.

I’m just sick to death of continuity at this point; continuity is the piano wire that Steven Moffat has been choking the show to death with. I’d love a series of Doctor Who where the Doctor has a different companion every episode with an implied backstory, and there’s no effort made to explain how much time has passed and what events have transpired between episodes.

My friend benhutchings has been making animated gifs lately.

Do you spend more time on the internet than you should? Does the sudden brutal stabbing murder of a loved one give you feels? Can you remember at least one incident from high school that bothered you in some way? Relax; you’re not crazy — you’re an introvert! Welcome to the club!
Still not sure? Take a look at these telltale signs, compiled by someone who nearly looked up ‘introvert’ in a dictionary.
You might be an Introvert if…
You read books
Only introverts know how to read. If you enjoy this quirky, archaic pastime, you might just be an introvert!
You go shopping by yourself
Sure, it seems pretty ‘weird’, but you can do without the normal entourage required to pop down the shops for milk and bread. You see a gang of twelve to fifteen fashionable kids crowded in the freezer aisle, gabbing into their mobile phones while all cooperatively picking up the same packet of frozen peas and placing it into their single shared trolley and think, “No thanks; I like cats!”
You like cats
Or dogs. Or one single dog. Anything mammalian, really, and birds too even. Most people punch a baby rabbit in the face every morning before breakfast, so if you see a baby rabbit and go, “Aw, so cute,” you’re probably an introvert.
You like to stay at home
Normal people literally explode if they stay in the same room for more than an hour, which is why they’re always dancing in the street, paragliding, swimming to the moon etc. If you get home from a hard day’s work and just want to relax on the couch with a hot cup of tea, guess what, you big ol’ introvert? That’s right it means you are one.
You’re intelligent, creative and thoughtful
Wouldn’t you know it, introverts are all of these! Heaps more than the average ‘popular’ moron.
You have a rich inner world
Your inner world is just so rich, what with all of your observations about things; it’s a pity most people are too busy going “Blah blah blah, shopping, television!” to notice. But someone willing to humbly defer to your hidden genius will discover that you are a brilliant conversationalist who knows about a band.
You need your quiet time and personal space
Extroverts sometimes run up to you, wild-eyed, and just start yelling; just “AAAAARGH!!! AAAAAAAAARGH!!!” at the top of their lungs, their face an inch away from your own. Most people would be like, “Who’s this sexy extrovert? I wanna get down with this person,” but an introvert like you is more likely to think, “Yikes! I’m uncomfortable.”
So if you’re an introvert, don’t worry! There are others like you, out there somewhere, suffering the same nearly-monthly indignity of people saying, “Are you okay?” or “Wow, you came!” to them. Just remember: being an introvert makes you special and interesting, like a black or a gay. Let’s show some introvert pride!

Do you spend more time on the internet than you should? Does the sudden brutal stabbing murder of a loved one give you feels? Can you remember at least one incident from high school that bothered you in some way? Relax; you’re not crazy — you’re an introvert! Welcome to the club!

Still not sure? Take a look at these telltale signs, compiled by someone who nearly looked up ‘introvert’ in a dictionary.

You might be an Introvert if…

  • You read books

Only introverts know how to read. If you enjoy this quirky, archaic pastime, you might just be an introvert!

  • You go shopping by yourself

Sure, it seems pretty ‘weird’, but you can do without the normal entourage required to pop down the shops for milk and bread. You see a gang of twelve to fifteen fashionable kids crowded in the freezer aisle, gabbing into their mobile phones while all cooperatively picking up the same packet of frozen peas and placing it into their single shared trolley and think, “No thanks; I like cats!”

  • You like cats

Or dogs. Or one single dog. Anything mammalian, really, and birds too even. Most people punch a baby rabbit in the face every morning before breakfast, so if you see a baby rabbit and go, “Aw, so cute,” you’re probably an introvert.

  • You like to stay at home

Normal people literally explode if they stay in the same room for more than an hour, which is why they’re always dancing in the street, paragliding, swimming to the moon etc. If you get home from a hard day’s work and just want to relax on the couch with a hot cup of tea, guess what, you big ol’ introvert? That’s right it means you are one.

  • You’re intelligent, creative and thoughtful

Wouldn’t you know it, introverts are all of these! Heaps more than the average ‘popular’ moron.

  • You have a rich inner world

Your inner world is just so rich, what with all of your observations about things; it’s a pity most people are too busy going “Blah blah blah, shopping, television!” to notice. But someone willing to humbly defer to your hidden genius will discover that you are a brilliant conversationalist who knows about a band.

  • You need your quiet time and personal space

Extroverts sometimes run up to you, wild-eyed, and just start yelling; just “AAAAARGH!!! AAAAAAAAARGH!!!” at the top of their lungs, their face an inch away from your own. Most people would be like, “Who’s this sexy extrovert? I wanna get down with this person,” but an introvert like you is more likely to think, “Yikes! I’m uncomfortable.”

So if you’re an introvert, don’t worry! There are others like you, out there somewhere, suffering the same nearly-monthly indignity of people saying, “Are you okay?” or “Wow, you came!” to them. Just remember: being an introvert makes you special and interesting, like a black or a gay. Let’s show some introvert pride!

silentgarfield:

How much

Why is she spelling the number out digit by digit?

silentgarfield:

How much

Why is she spelling the number out digit by digit?

Mirror???

GET OFF THE ROAD, STAY INDOORS

GET OFF THE ROAD, STAY INDOORS

WOW, I love this cute baby animal video, which this definitely is.

It’s a tiger cub trying to high-five a baby capybara!